Archive for the ‘North American Birds’ Category

The Northern Cardinal

Posted on March 7th, 2010 by admin

The Northern Cardinal (hereafter, cardinal), named for the male’s red plumage, is found throughout eastern and central North America from southern Canada into parts of Mexico and Central America. It has taken advantage of moderate temperatures, human habitation, and provisioning at Bird Feeders to expand its range northward since the early 1800s and has been […]

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Rose Breasted Grosbeak Bird

Posted on January 12th, 2010 by admin

What a shock to have two male Rose-Breasted Grosbeak birds on our bird feeder in the month of May. Then to our astonishment we had three females emerge! These birds are neo-tropical migrants. They spend the wintry weather months in an area from central Mexico to northern South America.

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Making Your Backyard Into a Hummingbird Habitat

Posted on December 11th, 2009 by admin

In order to draw hummingbirds to your backyard you must provide them the nectar producing flowers. There are quite a variety of blooming plants and you will want ones specific to where you live.

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Backyard Birds: American Robin

Posted on December 9th, 2009 by admin

The American Robin is the state bird of Connecticut, Michigan and Wisconsin, the American Robin is a familiar songbird in the thrush family. They exist in towns and woodlands, and are commonly seen on suburban lawns exhibiting their “running and stopping” actions as they collect their morning worms.

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Bobolink

Posted on November 23rd, 2009 by admin

The Bobolink is one of the most visually striking passerines in North America. Males—conspicuous morphologically, behaviorally, and vocally during the breeding season—look like they are wearing a tuxedo backward, leading some observers to refer to this species as the “skunk blackbird.”

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The Purple Martin

Posted on October 25th, 2009 by admin

Purple Martins are secondary cavity nesting animals. Due to human contribution, east of the Rockies, Purple Martins have under gone a behavioral change. This means that, for the main part, they no longer distinguish natural cavities as possible nest sites.

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The Gray Jay

Posted on September 30th, 2009 by admin

The Gray Jay is a widespread resident of North America’s boreal and sub-alpine coniferous forests. Occupation of permanent all-purpose territories in such climatically hostile biomes is made possible by this bird’s unusual food storage behavior.

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Backyard Birds: American Robin

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